13. Board Agile

13.1. Manifesto for Agile Software Development

We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value:

  • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

  • Working software over comprehensive documentation

  • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation

  • Responding to change over following a plan

That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.

Source: 1

13.2. Principles behind the Agile Manifesto

We follow these principles:

  • Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.

  • Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage.

  • Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.

  • Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.

  • Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.

  • The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.

  • Working software is the primary measure of progress.

  • Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.

  • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.

  • Simplicity–the art of maximizing the amount of work not done–is essential.

  • The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.

  • At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

Source: 2

13.3. Scrum

Scrum is a lightweight framework that helps people, teams and organizations generate value through adaptive solutions for complex problems.

In a nutshell, Scrum requires a Scrum Master to foster an environment where:

  1. A Product Owner orders the work for a complex problem into a Product Backlog.

  2. The Scrum Team turns a selection of the work into an Increment of value during a Sprint.

  3. The Scrum Team and its stakeholders inspect the results and adjust for the next Sprint.

  4. Repeat

Scrum is simple. Try it as is and determine if its philosophy, theory, and structure help to achieve goals and create value. The Scrum framework is purposefully incomplete, only defining the parts required to implement Scrum theory. Scrum is built upon by the collective intelligence of the people using it. Rather than provide people with detailed instructions, the rules of Scrum guide their relationships and interactions.

Various processes, techniques and methods can be employed within the framework. Scrum wraps around existing practices or renders them unnecessary. Scrum makes visible the relative efficacy of current management, environment, and work techniques, so that improvements can be made.

Source: 3

13.4. Planning and Refinement

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13.5. Scrum vs Kanban

  • Kanban

  • Scrum

  • Scrum + Kanban

  • Portfolio

  • Scrum vs. Kanban

  • Scrum and Kanban

    • Scrum -> Product Development (Story)

    • Kanban -> Maintenance and Bug-fixing (Task)

    • Team constitution and good practices

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13.6. References

1

Beck, Kent and Beedle, Mike and van Bennekum, Arie and Cockburn, Alistair and Cunningham, Ward and Fowler, Martin and Grenning, James and Highsmith, Jim and Hunt, Andrew and Jeffries, Ron and Kern, Jon and Marick, Brian and C. Martin, Robert and Mellor, Steve and Schwaber, Ken and Sutherland, Jeff and Dave Thomas. Manifesto for Agile Software Development. Year: 2001. URL Access Date: 2021-03-22. URL: https://agilemanifesto.org/iso/en/manifesto.html

2

Beck, Kent and Beedle, Mike and van Bennekum, Arie and Cockburn, Alistair and Cunningham, Ward and Fowler, Martin and Grenning, James and Highsmith, Jim and Hunt, Andrew and Jeffries, Ron and Kern, Jon and Marick, Brian and C. Martin, Robert and Mellor, Steve and Schwaber, Ken and Sutherland, Jeff and Dave Thomas. Principles behind the Agile Manifesto. Year: 2001. URL Access Date: 2021-03-22. URL: https://agilemanifesto.org/iso/en/principles.html

3

Schwaber, Ken and Sutherland, Jeff. The Scrum Guide, The Definitive Guide to Scrum: The Rules of the Game. Year: 2020. Accessed Date: 2021-03-22. URL: https://scrumguides.org/docs/scrumguide/v2020/2020-Scrum-Guide-US.pdf